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Beta release
This is a pre-release of "Spencer-Hill-Soundtracks.com". There are plenty of records left, waiting to be scanned and added to the internal database. The content will be updated regularly. Please revisit this site from time to time.
The vision
"Spencer-Hill-Soundtracks.com" is intended to become the most complete source of information about songs and soundtracks composed for movies starring Bud Spencer and Terence Hill. Of course, due to the huge variety of songs and records that were published in different countries by different labels in different versions on different media I know that it will be very hard if not impossible to create a complete listing. The main focus of this site is to give an overview of all the tracks that were composed for Bud Spencer and Terence Hill movies and to present all the soundtrack records that contain these tracks. Furthermore some compilation and "greatest hits" albums containing movie songs will be mentioned as well. Compilations are so numerous that it is not the target to show all of them but rather to give some examples. Anyway, there are some tracks that where only released on compilations (e.g. the title song of Virtual Weapon "I'm comin' home").
The Spencer-Hill movie sound
In my opinion the typical sound of Bud Spencer and Terence Hill movies was created in the 1970s and 80s by composers like Maurizio & Guido de Angelis, Franco Micalizzi, Angelo & Carmelo la Bionda, Pino Donaggio, Walter Rizzati and Ennio Morricone. These fantastic songs are characterized by very delightful and catchy music often vocalized by great voices. Another great category of rather serious soundtracks was composed for the early Spencer-Hill movies by artists like Carlo Rustichelli or Gian Piero & Gian Franco Reverberi. This sound mostly accompanies the great western themes. Additionally Bud Spencer and Terence Hill had some bit parts at the beginning of their career. Of course the music of these movies has nothing to do with the "Spencer-Hill sound". The songs will be listed on this site anyway.
The records
Over the decades that passed since Bud Spencer and Terence Hill became actors not only the style of their movies evolved. Also the storage media used for the soundtracks changed. E.g. the movie sound of "Quo Vadis" was pressed on shellac at first. Nowadays most of the soundtracks are available on CD. However there are others that still only exist as vinyl pressings or audio tapes.